Recent Publications

Assessing the impact of the National Department of Health’s National Adherence Guidelines for Chronic Diseases in South Africa using routinely collected data: a cluster-randomised evaluation

Background: Long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence is critical for achieving optimal HIV treatment outcomes. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) single-pill regimens, introduced in South Africa in April 2013, has simplified pill taking. We evaluated treatment outcomes among patients initiated on a FDC compared to a similar multi-pill ART regimen in Johannesburg, South Africa. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of ART-naïve HIV-positive non-pregnantadult (≥18 years) 

The right combination – treatment outcomes among HIV-positive patients initiating first-line fixed-dose antiretroviral therapy in a public sector HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa

Background: Long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence is critical for achieving optimal HIV treatment outcomes. Fixed-dose combination (FDC) single-pill regimens, introduced in South Africa in April 2013, has simplified pill taking. We evaluated treatment outcomes among patients initiated on a FDC compared to a similar multi-pill ART regimen in Johannesburg, South Africa. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of ART-naïve HIV-positive non-pregnant adult (≥18 years) 

Treatment eligibility and retention in clinical HIV care: A regression discontinuity study in South Africa

Background Loss to follow-up is high among HIV patients not yet receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Clinical trials have demonstrated the clinical efficacy of early ART; however, these trials may miss an important real-world consequence of providing ART at diagnosis: its impact on retention in care. Methods and findings We examined the effect of immediate (versus deferred) ART on retention in care using a regression discontinuity design. The analysis included all patients (N = 

SA’s HIV treatment programme: Study reveals cost-saving measures can offset increasing ART costs

Monday, 27 November 2017: Increases in antiretroviral treatment costs for HIV/AIDS patients in South Africa have been offset by the introduction of cost-saving measures and universal treatment, according to a study led by a researcher from the Health Economics and Epidemiology Research Office (HE2RO), a collaboration between Wits’ School of Medicine and Boston University’s School of Public Health. The study, published this month in PLoS­ ONE, an internationally regarded science and 

Changing the South African national antiretroviral therapy guidelines: The role of cost modelling

Background We were tasked by the South African Department of Health to assess the cost implications to the largest ART programme in the world of adopting sets of ART guidelines issued by the World Health Organization between 2010 and 2016.   Methods Using data from large South African ART clinics (n = 24,244 patients), projections of patients in need of ART, and cost data from bottom-up cost analyses, we constructed a population level health-state transition model with 

Revealed willingness-to-pay versus standard cost-effectiveness thresholds: Evidence from the South African HIV Investment Case

Background The use of cost-effectiveness thresholds based on a country's income per capita has been criticized for not being relevant to decision making, in particular in middle-income countries such as South Africa. The recent South African HIV Investment Case produced an alternative cost-effectiveness threshold for HIV prevention and treatment interventions based on estimates of life years saved and the country's committed HIV budget. Methods We analysed the optimal mix of HIV 

Acceptability and feasibility of a financial incentive intervention to improve retention in HIV care among pregnant women in Johannesburg, South Africa

Women initiating antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy are at high risk of dropping out of HIV care after delivery. We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of a financial incentive – a onetime R50 (∼USD4) supermarket voucher for completing one postpartum visit ≤10 weeks of delivery – to improve postpartum retention. We enrolled 100 pregnant, HIV-positive women at a primary health clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Participants were interviewed at enrollment and we reviewed 

Field evaluation of performance of Alere and Cepheid qualitative HIV assays for pediatric point-of-care testing in an academic hospital in Soweto, South Africa

Point-of-care (POC) technologies for HIV diagnosis in infants have the potential to overcome logistical challenges that delay treatment initiation and prevent improvements in morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of two POC technologies against the current standard-of-care (SOC) laboratory-based assay in South Africa, when operated by nurses in a hospital environment. Children 18 months of age who were treatment naive (excluding prophylaxis) and in whom an HIV 

Costs and cost-effectiveness of LEEP versus cryotherapy for treating cervical dysplasia among HIV-positive women in Johannesburg, South Africa –Manuscript Draft–

Cervical cancer incidence is significant in countries, such as South Africa, with high burdens of both HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is largely preventable if dysplasia is diagnosed and treated early, but there is debate regarding the best approaches for screening and treatment, especially for low-resource settings. Currently South Africa provides Pap smears followed by colposcopic biopsy and LEEP if needed in its public health facilities. We estimated the costs and 

The health service costs of offering female condoms in South Africa’s National Female Condom Program 2015/16

The female condom (FC) was identified by the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition in 2011 as one of several under-used reproductive health technologies with the potential to expand choice in reproductive health and family planning programs, responding to the needs of diverse clients (1). The FC is also key to increasing HIV protection options for women and men. It is the only female-initiated HIV prevention barrier method. Although FC distribution rates lag far behind those of male condoms 

Comparison of Kaposi Sarcoma Risk in HIV-Positive Adults Across 5 Continents: A Multiregional Multicohort Study

Background. We compared Kaposi sarcoma (KS) risk in adults who started antiretroviral therapy (ART) across the Asia-Pacific, South Africa, Europe, Latin, and North America. Methods. We included cohort data of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive adults who started ART after 1995 within the framework of 2 large collaborations of observational HIV cohorts. We present incidence rates and adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs). Results. We included 208 140 patients from 57 countries. Over a