All Reports

Differentiated service delivery models for antiretroviral tratment of HIV in sub-saharan Africa: A rapid systematic review ; AMBIT Project Report Number 04

Throughout sub-Saharan Africa, most national HIV programs are striving to achieve the 90-90-90 (or even 95-95-95) targets for HIV diagnosis, treatment, and viral suppression. The rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs to reach these targets has created shortfalls in health system capacity and quality.1 In response, many countries are scaling up alternative service delivery approaches, or differentiated service delivery (DSD) models. DSD models differ from conventional HIV care 

Differentiated models of service delivery (DSD) for antiretroviral treatment of HIV in subSaharan Africa: A review of the gray literature as of June 2019 AMBIT Project Report Number 03

To achieve global targets for the treatment and prevention of HIV, most high prevalence countries are working towards scaling up alternative service delivery approaches, or differentiated service delivery (DSD) models. DSD models aim to achieve a number of potential benefits to both providers and patients, including better clinical outcomes, greater patient satisfaction, lower cost, and more efficient and convenient service delivery. To date, most DSD model development and implementation has 

Provider costs associated with differentiated models of service delivery for HIV treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa AMBIT Project Report Number 02

According to the most recent estimates, 16.4 million people are receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa.1 Global “90-90-90” targets for HIV diagnosis, treatment, and viral suppression call for universal access and rapid-scale-up of treatment coverage, which would require another 3 million patients to be added to the national HIV treatment programs in eastern and southern Africa.1 Meanwhile, donor spending in low and middle-income countries has declined over the 

Patient benefits and costs associated with differentiated models of service delivery for HIV treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa AMBIT Project Report Number 01

Costs and benefits of DSDs to patients themselves (as opposed to costs and benefits to providers and funders) are often omitted from evaluations of specific models of service delivery and from mathematical modeling of potential impact. As part of a larger rapid review of the published and gray literature on the outcomes of DSDs since 2016, in this report we present and discuss the subset of sources that provide empirical information on patient costs and benefits and the acceptability of DSDs 

Consolidated spending on HIV and TB in South Africa (2014/15–2016/17)

This review of HIV and TB expenditure in South Africa is an input to policy, planning and management processes within and amongst spheres of government and between government and development partners. The data have been especially useful to national and provincial programme managers as they perform their oversight functions, leading to improved spending of available resources. With 52 annexes, it also serves as an authoritative reference document detailing levels and trends in HIV and TB 

THE HEALTH SERVICE COSTS OF OFFERING FEMALE CONDOMS IN SOUTH AFRICA’S NATIONAL FEMALE CONDOM PROGRAMME 2015/16

The female condom (FC) was identified by the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition in 2011 as one of several under-used reproductive health technologies having the potential to expand choice in reproductive health and family planning programs, add value to the method mix, and respond to the needs of diverse types of clients. The FC also is key to increasing HIV protection options for women and men, and is the only female-initiated HIV prevention barrier method. Although FC distribution rates 

South African Health Review 2017 – Chapter 17

The South African Health Review (SAHR) has been published by Health Systems Trust (HST) since 1995. Since 2014, it has been internationally recognized as a peer-reviewed journal. According to HST, the Review is considered to be a critical resource for understanding, from a South African perspective, local and international public health issues. In the 2016 edition of the Review, HE2RO Senior Researcher, Naomi Lince-Deroche, collaborated with South African academics and the National Department 

South African Health Review 2016 – Chapter 17

The South African Health Review (SAHR) has been published by Health Systems Trust (HST) since 1995. Since 2014, it has been internationally recognized as a peer-reviewed journal. According to HST, the Review is considered to be a critical resource for understanding, from a South African perspective, local and international public health issues. In the 2016 edition of the Review, HE2RO Senior Researcher and Boston University Assistant Professor Dr Gesine Meyer-Rath and HE2RO research associate 

South African Health Review 2016 – Chapter 9

The South African Health Review (SAHR) has been published by Health Systems Trust (HST) since 1995. Since 2014, it has been internationally recognized as a peer-reviewed journal. According to HST, the Review is considered to be a critical resource for understanding, from a South African perspective, local and international public health issues. In the 2016 edition of the Review, HE2RO Senior Researcher, Naomi Lince-Deroche, collaborated with South African academics and the National Department