Recent Publications

Brief #5: Capital and Investment

The direct effects of health-related productivity shocks on economic output are magnified by their negative impact on investment. Poorer health decreases productivity, which results in lower economic output and consequently lower investment, which again reduces productivity and output over time. Higher mortality reduces incentives for saving and investment. Empirical studies (not HIV-specific) suggest that this could be an important link between HIV and growth, but there is no clear 

Brief #6: Productivity and Employment of People Living With HIV

Early on, there were concerns that AIDS-related mortality would erode state governance and institutions and thus compromise economic development, but there is little evidence to suggest that such effects have been significant. HIV – especially at late stages of disease progression –results in reduced productivity and lower employment of people living with HIV, though the economy-wide effects are unclear. Treatment has been effective in restoring the productivity and – with some 

Health provider perspectives on the implementation of the same‑day‑ART initiation policy in the Gauteng province of South Africa

Results: The data indicates inconsistencies across facilities and incongruities between counsellor and nursing provider perspectives regarding the SDI policy implementation. While nurses highlighted the clinical benefits of early  ART initiation, they expressed concerns that immediate ART may be overwhelming for some patients, who may be unprepared and likely to disengage from care soon after the initial acceptance of ART. Accordingly, the SDI implementation was slow due to limited patient 

Brief #7: Economic Growth – Overview

HIV has increased mortality and slowed population growth. As a consequence, GDP is lower and will remain lower than it would have been without the impact of HIV. Economic modelling suggests that the short- to medium-term impacts of HIV on GDP per capita are unclear, with important effects working in opposite directions. In the longer run, the effects are likely dominated by adverse impacts on education and skills. The empirical evidence on the link between HIV and growth of GDP per capita 

Brief #17: The Economics of HIV and of HIV Programmes in the Era of COVID-19

The Covid-19 pandemic has profound negative implications for the economies of countries most affected by HIV, as well as for donor countries that support the global HIV response. It undermines underlying economic fundamentals and adds considerations for HIV policymaking. This paper explores three interrelated ways in which the Covid-19 pandemic and the response to Covid-19 affect people living with HIV and the HIV response: (1) the health impacts of those living with or at risk of acquiring 

Community-based delivery of HIV treatment in Zambia: costs and outcomes

The DSD models assessed cost more per patient/year than conventional care. Costs ranged from an annual $116 to $199 for the DSD models, compared with $100 for conventional care. CAGs and UAGs increased retention by 2 and 14%, respectively. All DSD models cost more per patient retained at 12 months than conventional care. The CAG had the lowest cost/patient retained for DSD models ($140–157). Conclusions: Although they achieve equal or improved retention in care, out-of-facility models of 

Opportunities from a new disease for an old threat: Extending COVID-19 efforts to address tuberculosis in South Africa

The COVID-19 pandemic and phased nationwide lockdown have impacted negatively on individuals with tuberculosis (TB) and routine TB services. Through a literature review and the perspective of members of a national TB Think Tank task team, we describe the impact of the pandemic and lockdown on TB patients and services as well as the potential long-term setback to TB control in South Africa (SA). Strategies to mitigate risk and impact are explored, together with opportunities to leverage 

Bringing Data Analytics to the Design of Optimized Diagnostic Networks in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Process, Terms and Definitions

Diagnostics services are an essential component of healthcare systems, advancing universal health coverage and ensuring global health security, but are often unavailable or under-resourced in low- and middle-income (LMIC) countries. Typically, diagnostics are delivered at various tiers of the laboratory network based on population needs, and resource and infrastructure constraints. A diagnostic network additionally incorporates screening and includes point-of-care testing that may occur outside 

Incidence and predictors of sexually transmitted infections among adult HIV-positive patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at Themba Lethu HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa

Background. Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among people living with HIV/AIDS can facilitate the spread of HIV. Objectives. To estimate STI incidence and identify predictors of STI acquisition among HIV-positive patients during their first 24 months of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Johannesburg, South Africa. Methods. We conducted a cohort study using prospectively collected routine data on patients who initiated ART between January 2004 and January 2015 at the Themba Lethu HIV 

Community health worker models in South Africa: a qualitative study on policy implementation of the 2018/19 revised framework

Abstract South Africa has a long history of community health workers (CHWs). It has been a journey that has required balancing constrained resources and competing priorities. CHWs form a bridge between communities and healthcare service provision within health facilities and act as the cornerstone of South Africa’s Ward-Based Primary Healthcare Outreach Teams. This study aimed to document the CHW policy implementation landscape across six provinces in South Africa and explore the reasons 

Retention in care and viral suppression in differentiated service delivery models for HIV treatment delivery in sub-Saharan Africa: a rapid systematic review

Abstract Introduction: Differentiated service delivery (DSD) models for antiretroviral treatment (ART) for HIV are being scaled up in the expectation that they will better meet the needs of patients, improve the quality and efficiency of treatment delivery and reduce costs while maintaining at least equivalent clinical outcomes. We reviewed the recent literature on DSD models to describe what is known about clinical outcomes. Methods: We conducted a rapid systematic review of peer-reviewed 

Cost-effectiveness of adoption strategies for point of care HIV viral load monitoring in South Africa

Viral load (VL) testing is recommended for monitoring people on ART. The National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) in South Africa conducts >5million laboratory-based VL tests but faces challenges with specimen integrity and results delivery. Point-of-care (POC) VL monitoring may improve VL suppression (VLS). We assessed the cost-effectiveness of different strategies for POC testing in South Africa. Methods: We developed a cost-outcome model utilizing NHLS data, including facility-level